Quiet 10/29/2013

Hi Everyone!

Just a quick note to say we aren’t leaving Wednesday as planned.  We closed on the condo today at noon, so we’re officially “homeless on Mackinac.”  We’ve been too busy today to get all our cleaning done, and now we plan to leave on the 8 a.m. ferry on Thursday morning. 

Ted and I hurried down the hill this morning to see Jill off on the 11:00 ferry.  Ted had seven more shipping boxes precariously balanced on his hand cart, but he managed to get down the hill with only one spill - and it was a minor one.

Ted and I hurried down the hill this morning to see Jill off on the 11:00 ferry. Ted had seven more shipping boxes precariously balanced on his hand cart, but he managed to get down to town with only one spill – and it was a minor one.  Grand Hotel employees were still leaving in large numbers, but Jill made it on board with no trouble.  She texted me a little after 4:00 to let me know she’d made it home to Lansing safely.

Mary Stancik was on the dock seeing someone off also.  I think we'll be leaving on the same boat Thursday morning.

Mary Stancik was on the dock seeing someone off also. I think we’ll be leaving on the same boat Thursday morning.

After we closed, we ate lunch at the Seabiscuit, then started back to the condo to start our second day of cleaning.  I think the Seabiscuit, the Village Inn (which will be closed the month of November), and the Mustang are the only restaurants open now.

After we closed on the condo, we ate lunch at the Seabiscuit.  Ted stayed downtown to run some errands, and I started back to the condo to begin the second day of cleaning. I think the Seabiscuit (which is closing soon), Cawthone’s Village Inn (which will be closed the month of November), and the Mustang are the only restaurants open now.  Hoban Street was very quiet . . .

. . . and so was Cadotte

. . . and so was Cadotte.  From Market Street all the way to the Grand, I was the only person on the street.

When I reached the Grand and turned around to look back toward town

When I reached the top of Grand Hill and turned around to look back toward town, the only other person was a lady pushing a cart filled with white bags. 

This is an entirely different Mackinac Island than most are used to seeing.  There were a few tourists in the Seabiscuit, but many more locals.  Awnings are being removed, shop windows covered, and painting has begun on several businesses.  All the outside maintenance has to be done before the snow begins.

As I walked up the hill, the silence was like slipping alone into a great cathedral.  As much as I love Mackinac in the summer – with bikes whizzing by, people laughing and talking, and taxi and dray and carriage horses clip-clopping up and down the streets – I may love this great quietness, surrounded by so much beauty, even more. 

These last few days have been spent exploring all kinds of options, but nothing has been decided except we don’t think we’re ready to only have Mackinac in our lives for one or two months.  We need to go home to think and pray it all through again.  And wait for God’s answer.

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Mackinac Island Winter Update – Vol. 14 – 3/7/2012

This past weekend Islanders got what they’ve been waiting for all winter – a big snow event!  Fourteen inches of big, fat, fluffy snowflakes fell over a two-day period, turning magical Mackinac into a white wonderland.  If I could have chosen one time to be on the Island this winter, this would have been the time!

The post tonight is all about the beauty of Mackinac in the cold of winter.  Through photographs from friends on the Island, I hope you will sense the quiet peacefulness of this special place at this time of year.  Every season on the Island has its own story to tell, and tonight the story is serenity.

Photos by Robert McGreevy

Leap Day (Feb. 29) dawned with rough water - giving a hint of what was to come.

On the first day of March, the first snow flurries arrived. The flag at the Post Cemetery, always flown at half-staff, could barely be seen through the wind-whipped snowflakes.

Photos by Harbor View Inn

On Friday night, the heart of the storm hit the Island.

Downtown looked pretty deserted. The snowmobiles parked along the street probably belong to folks who left the island for the night or weekend. When they return, they'll have to blow snow off their "ride" before they can go home! I can't even imagine what riding through this would be like . . . . but I'd like to find out!

Street lamps cast a blue tint on the east end of Main Street. That first white house is the art museum.

Photo by Nicole Doud

Nicole and Andrew's dog, Charlie, gets an early morning walk through wonderland on Saturday morning.

Photos by Doud’s Market

Doud's Market Sign on Saturday morning. Yes - of course they were open!

I wonder if snowmobiles have those electric seat-warmers like some cars have.

At last! Islanders could ride their machines without having to skip all over the road looking for snow patches! This is Main Street in front of the marina.

Fort Street. The Trinity Church steeple blends into the gray skies, as more snow falls.

The lady on the hill sits wrapped in her blanket of white.

I love all these photos, but this is one of my favorite. The Island library has just enough color to peek out from all that white. This would have been a great day to sit in front of the library fireplace, read a good book, and occasionally glance out the back door at the half-frozen Straits.

Market Street - a real, live snow globe.

The boardwalk - out past the library.

Photos by Heather May

A big, very old lilac tree . . .

. . . stands as a silent sentinel at the corner of this Cadotte home.

Another Cadotte home. I love that splash of blue against all that white.

The Lucky Bean Coffee House (Mackinac newest coffee spot). Come spring, there will be a cute little table and chairs outside that front door so you can sit and enjoy their yummy hot drinks and fresh-baked pastries.

The Cloghaun Bed & Breakfast . . .

. . . and the Metivier Inn Bed & Breakfast. Do you remember how the yards of these two inns look during the summer? Each is a riot of flowers in every color in the rainbow.

A quick glimpse down Hoban Street shows snowmobiles parked across from the Cawthone Village Inn.

French Lane looks empty except for a few tree branches that gave way under the heavy snow.

The Shepler Dock. You can see on the far right that someone started to walk out to the end, and then had a change of heart.

This photo of Fort Street shows a little more of Fort Mackinac. You can see, in the upper left corner, where the awning is missing. All Mackinac awnings are removed at the end of the season so winter storms can't ruin them.

I think in most places, it's the streets that are snowplowed. On Mackinac, it's the sidewalks. Love it!

Sigh.  Sigh.  Sigh.  What a wonderful world up there in the frozen north.  Of course, I’m not the one shoveling the snow!

Come on back next week, and I’ll see what news I can round up from our favorite Island.  See you then.  God bless.